Wales is proud of its heritage and guards it well. Pembrokeshire has its own particular history, of invaders and defenders from the Iron Age to the last century. Hence there is a wealth of castles, earthworks, forts and lookouts to explore, from the huge medieval bastions of Manorbier or Pembroke Castles in the south to the fascinating reconstruction of an Iron Age Village and Fortress at Castell Henllys in the north. The sarsen stones of Stonehenge in England were quarried here on the tops of Preseli Hills, and it is still a mystery how they were transported, 4000 years ago. Burial cairns and dolmen of chieftains dot the skyline or stand on promontories overlooking the sea. Some ancient churches have even more ancient sacred stones standing next to them, with gnarled Yew trees and eroded earth mounds hinting at even longer human attachment to the site. The grandest of church architecture is in the tiny city of St Davids, where the beautiful Cathedral was mostly built in the 12th century. There is also a ruined Bishops Palace sitting next to it, often the setting for plays and poetry-readings in the summer. And no description of Pembrokeshire's historical riches would be complete without mentioning the Last Invasion of the British mainland. it was the French, and in 1797, and they were routed by a mock militia of local women in national costume. For the full story you should visit the Last Invasion Tapestry in Fishguard Library, a craftwork stitched in 1997 in the style of the Bayeux Tapestry.

This map was created using GPS Visualizer's do-it-yourself geographic utilities.

Please wait while the map data loads...